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Date:

  02/08/2004, 19:03:23

From:

  Cynthia

To:

  Everyone

Subject:

  Re: You may be right, but...
Message:

Hi Anthony,

I had already read Doc's response to "Liberation" on the Cat's Whisker and found it to be yet another rationalization by a premie who has had K for a long time but claims he "got over" the concepts of the mind courtesy of Maharaji, even though the trappings of the cult at the time he was introduced were a "put off" to him.  That is a declaration that Maharaji has powers greater than normal human beings.  "Liberation" was claiming that Maharaji must come clean about the accusations on EPO in order to "clear the air" so that more propagation can take place.  This was written by a premie and Doc responded. 

I've been thinking about this issue of "having concepts" about Maharaji and Knowledge.  From the day I heard my first satsang the idea of "having concepts" about M and K was spoken of as something to be avoided. Learning not to think about any questions that might come up about M and K was how to "get it," i.e., if one listens to enough satsang and tapes of Maharaji, all answers will be revealed.  That continues to go on today.  If aspirants have questions they are told to listen to this or that tape and answers will be found by listening to M.  So, removing critical thinking is the first step in recruitment and indoctrination and it begins to develop naturally as time goes on and it becomes the goal of the aspirant.   

Maharaji continues to use the same message today which is "you must kill your concepts about K and himself,"  in order to make the bed of one's heart fertile enough to receive the seed of the Knowledge of Self.  Killing concepts for me means losing one's critical thinking process (essentially giving it up).  That is the first method of mind-conditioning and the same one implanted in us as young people in the 70s in order to be able to accept Maharaji's message, love, and ultimately, Knowledge.  It was and is a process of indoctination that leads an aspirant to the Knowledge selection and sesssion. 

Ex-Premies are often accused by the "other camp" of failing in the practice of Knowledge because we had too many concepts about Maharaji and were not able to accept the many changes over the years that took place in his organizations and the way Maharaji changed the way he presented himself.   That's an incorrect argument and not true.  Or, it is argued that we were "church ladies" in our belief-system and that was because of our many "concepts."  Of course, it was never because of what Maharaji told us over and over and over -- our failure was our own.  There was even the book-burning event in the 80s that was conducted in order for Maharaji to reinvent himself and his PR image by removing all material that linked him to his own personal history as "Guru Maharaj Ji."  Then there was the gag order placed upon premies that continues today:  don't talk about your experience of Knowledge or you'll give the "wrong concepts" to newcomers.

I'm not being skeptical, I'm being critical.  I think I'm correct, too.  My assessment now is based on having successfully removed from my thinking processes Maharaji's ideas and indoctrination, including the removal of "having concepts about Knowledge/Maharaji" (and much more). That allows me to take a truthful and critical look at what he has done in the past and what he continues to do today.  Nothing has really changed except the outside trappings, which is an ironic word:  Trappings.  I've done so much reading and research on this subject in general and about Maharaji specifically that I can only conclude that Maharaji is a narcissistic personality cult leader. That's a dangerous and harmful person for anyone at any age to follow as their teacher or Master.

Therefore, I cannot see any benefit for anyone, young or old, in any setting and under any circumstances to be exposed to anything Maharaji says or presents, including the techniques of Knowledge.  There are stages of the indoctrination process that take place.  For instance, those who have Knowledge are allowed to see certain videos while others are reserved for newcomers and those interested in learning more.  It's a specific recruiting tool that's been honed over the years through revisionism but it's the same message and the same cult.  It also takes a lot of time out of a person's life and in the process they are being conditioned to stop being critical in their youthful, independent minds. 

It's quite common for gurus and other group leaders to reinvent themselves over and over during their careers.  That doesn't make them less destructive to people, it only changes the outside wrappers.  Those youthful parties with videos are yet another method invented because Maharaji most certainly has a mission in life and he'll try to complete it at anyone's expense, including and especially young people who may be more open and vulnerable.

Be well,

Cynthia




Date:

  02/09/2004, 15:30:29

From:

  Anthony

To:

  Everyone

Subject:

  Re: You may be right, but...
Message:
Hi,

This is in answer to Cynth's post: 'Yes, you may be right, but..' below.

‘I had already read Doc's response to "Liberation" on the Cat's Whisker and found it to be yet another rationalization by a premie who has had K for a long time but claims he "got over" the concepts of the mind courtesy of Maharaji, even though the trappings of the cult at the time he was introduced were a "put off" to him. That is a declaration that Maharaji has powers greater than normal human beings. "Liberation" was claiming that Maharaji must come clean about the accusations on EPO in order to "clear the air" so that more propagation can take place. This was written by a premie and Doc responded.’

Without accusing Doc of anything, I think his response is a well-crafted presentation of the current revision. I think he is doing his best job (consciously or not) of presenting the current Party line, but maybe it is also false memory. Doc’s an astute guy, and he probably did have a measure of detachment from the strongest conditioning, but the notion of anyone sticking around for over 30 years who at the time was not enchanted by the notion of the Perfect Incarnation with more powers than ever before is quite unbelievable. Let’s just call it false or desired memory.
I think he is doing a service for someone he feels a deep love for, even though this means tampering quite fickly with factual reality.
I particularly enjoyed the ‘12 year-old kid’ mention. As Maharaji was 13 when he hit the West, this stands out immediately as one blur of fact too far.

To answer maybe inadequately the rest of your detailed post, I would agree that the basis of any cult or belief system is ideally to persuade the conscripts to abandon objective analysis and accept the Leader as sole source of reality.
I think, however, that the degree of success of this stratagem will always depend on a number of factors, chiefly their state of dependence, worldly inexperience, youth, educational background, general nous (common sense) and so on.
Some of the people who embraced Maharaji had actually had successful academic careers, and to them the idea of chucking up all objective reason would have been very difficult. I myself was in this category, which was why I was consistently refused Knowledge for months. I received it sort of by the back door, from a mahatma abroad who seemed very lenient and humanitarian.
Such people, I think, accepted the various underpinning ‘concepts’ of Knowledge and the Perfect Master as a series of key building blocks which gradually created a total paradigm.
Given the IMO quite massive energy of the time, Maharaji’s sequestred off-stage existence and formalised public appearances, one could open to the possibility of the immaculate Master, who talked to the soul, not necessarily to the reason. Indeed, too much of the reason had apparently been the thing which had got us into the shit beforehand. Thus, feeling became over-strained to the detriment of objective reason.

Thinking about satsang, there were two distinct categories of this. The first was that of the Master, held to be sacrosanct. The other, nightly community satsang, was really of a different league.
During the many times I heard this, we would quite commonly go home discussing the substance of the evening, agreeing that someone had given great satsang, which might really have been personal ideas or stories, but which transferred an essence or uplifting energy. Someone might have been greatly inspiring while talking obvious cock. The music was commonly great.

Even when I listened to Maharaji’s immaculate satsang, I used to pass it through an internal filter, making it conform to essential acceptable notions, though these, of course, became further and further out. It is quite amazing how common sense can be extended to extremely elastic limits, so long as there are a few grains of reality somewhere in there.

The net result of following such a Master is that the whole of our psychological make-up becomes infiltrated however by his utterances, trimmed maybe a bit here and there to fit, so that our whole inner reality belongs to him, and becomes his domain.

As you say, the notion of independent critical thinking has to be abandoned, or can be accepted just marginally so long as it doesn’t question the new underlying imbedded reality. One of the maybe rococo examples of this is when Maharaji used commonly to stress that common sense is uncommon. Presumably common sense here was acceptable in a limited sphere concerned with the realisation of ‘objective’ worldly activities such as propagation, the organisation of events, and so on, where it was indispensable.
But not meant to carry over to questioning of the basic fundamental principles.

Thus, however, the notion of ‘concept denying’ in terms of not ever using the head could never be really water-tight within DLM/EV.

The whole event runs on the basic fundamental idea that Maharaji is that energy within, the Self itself. Once that is deeply imbibed, a certain use of common sense, even objective thought is admissible, because it will inevitably run up against an insurmountable roadblock about ultimate internal experiential realities.

To people educated by George Orwell, the idea of a totally indoctrinated membership (in his case the bureaucratic and intellectual echelons - the proles were superfluous) might be appealing as the model.
However, in a real dictatorship of the mind, such as Soviet communism, there were always intelligent or aware people who laughed ironically or their socks off behind the curtains at the latest doings of the Boss (Stalin in that case).
EV or whatever it is currently called, and the Cat’s Whisker, are also peopled by such people. They’re as astute as you and I. They see bull-shit when it is up their noses, and are actually quite personable and likeable sometimes.

However, the main thing to remember of these indoctrinational scenarios is to plant the essential conditioning micro-chip (the Boss is the Superior Power, or its closest imaginable representative), then they will always return home, no matter how much intelligent or imaginative latitude they believe they possess.

Best wishes,

Anthony


5 Brighter than 1000 suns as seen through night vision goggles
4 As bright as the lights on Maharaji's jet
3 As bright as a 60 watt light bulb
2 As bright as a pile of burning ghi on a swinging arti tray
1 As bright as the inner light as seen by the third eye


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